Author Archives: Emma

Emma Found Sounds: Plastic

 

 

It transports our food, builds our furniture and enables our technology – whether we like it or not, we’re all wrapped in plastic. So, what does the sticky stuff have to say for itself?

Plastic bottles are daily accessories for many. 365DaysOfSound records their quiet companionship:

Paul Dickinson catches a plastic tarp in motion:

German Castro takes it au natural, as water meets a plastic pipe:

Emma Found Sounds: Celebration

Found Sounds is a SoundCloud community feature focusing on some of the most weird and wonderful sounds that can be found on SoundCloud.

With summer shining over half the earth and the Olympics just around the corner, Celebration is upon us. So, this week we’ve rounded up a collection of celebratory sounds to help get you feeling festive.

Nothing says party like the pop of a champagne bottle:

The excitement of a group of people can be infectious. Get amongst it with Jaciotelo:

Audiopimps steps outside the box and takes the cheer out of a cheering crowd, in this powerfully moody track:

But while it’s great to listen to other peoples’ celebrations, it’s even better to get out there and capture the moment yourself!

 

Emma Found Sounds: beat, bang, build

Found Sounds is a SoundCloud community feature focusing on some of the most weird and wonderful sounds that can be found on SoundCloud.

building up

If a construction team parked itself outside your bedroom window, you’d be forgiven for gluing your earlobes together and pulling your sheets over your head. But while construction sounds can be abrasive, they also reveal some magic in the every day. This week we’re showcasing the most raw sounds of a city, alongside others that highlight beauty in the banging.

Ever wondered how modern cranes communicate with ancient ruins? Kitchen Sink Sounds captures the conversation, in all its messy madness.

Schneider TM arranges Berlin’s most organic sounds to draw a connection between construction and electronic music – beat by beat, brick by brick.

Bruce Odland and Sam Auinger have gone a step further, meshing construction sounds with the city at large. Planes, trains and hammers form an urban orchestra, giving today’s industrialized city a voice.

So next time you see a fluorescent vest, a crane, or a bunch of bricks in motion, stop and open your ears – they just might have a story to share.