Tag Archives: creator

Brendan Meet On SoundCloud Premier Partner Stick Figure

On SoundCloud Premier Partner Stick FigureWelcome to a new blog series – Meet On SoundCloud Premier Partners – where we’ll be interviewing the first SoundCloud creators invited to be a part of the Premier level of On SoundCloud, our creator partner program. Premier partners can choose to monetize their tracks in the U.S. and share revenue generated on SoundCloud. We’ve been expanding the number of artists in the Premier Partner level since we launched On SoundCloud in August.

Our first interview is with California-based Scott Woodruff, a multi-instrumentalist and producer who performs as Stick Figure.

Introduce yourself to the SoundCloud community:

I make dub reggae music, but more than a genre, I make music that makes you feel good. It’s about capturing everything that is beautiful in this world, a special feeling or mood that elevates the mundane into the majestic, and putting that in the form of a song. I try to make music that is both relatable and accessible, that can remind you of a feeling or an experience or even a color, or another song and how that song made you feel at that time in your life. Hopefully that brings a smile to your face or bounce to your step throughout the day.

How do you use SoundCloud?

First and foremost, I use SoundCloud to listen to my favorite bands. It’s also my discovery tool. I have come across artists on SoundCloud and gone on to collaborate with them in the creation of new music. Its also the ideal platform for my music to be accessible to the world, from format to functionality, it just works.

Describe your creative process: 

It all starts with a feeling I draw from my experiences out on the road and in this world. I try to capture that feeling back in my studio at home. I have every instrument in my studio and they all play their role in the finished product. I’ll jump from the keyboard over to the bass and back to the drums until everything is perfect. I feel most in my element when turning these feelings that everyone has into music everyone can experience.

How have you reached certain goals or steps in your career?

Staying consistent with output has been the biggest factor in my growth. The new music allows for fans to be built organically, without any gimmicks. Motivation and passion are also essential. You have to be all in with every part of your being or it is impossible to make a career in music. As you grow your career, the right people will come along to assist the growth and you just have to trust your gut on who to work with as opposed to the glitz or promises. When reaching out, I find it’s best to keep it short and sweet and let the quality of your product speak for itself.

Where do you want to take your career next?

I have been using SoundCloud since day one, so it is a huge honor to be a Premier Partner. I look forward to supporting the platform during its evolution and growth. As long as I am able to keep writing and performing music every day, that’s all I ever wanted for my career.

Are there people that you’d like to collaborate or work with?

I would love to work with Kyle from Slightly Stoopid, Eric from Rebelution, Barrington Levy and Alpha Blondy. I would have given anything to work with Gregory Isaacs, his passing was a huge loss for reggae and music as a whole.

Anything else? 

Big up to [SoundCloud employees] Ted Suh, Jane Shin and Kush Arora for believing in Stick Figure and treating Reggae music as a genre worthy of attention. Reggae has existed on the margins for so long its amazing to see people gravitating towards the good vibes recently, both in support for my music, but also with Chronixx being on Jimmy Fallon, in the Magic! song “Rude” hitting number one in the country with a straight reggae beat, and the support for the live shows we have experienced touring amphitheaters with Rebelution this summer and playing huge reggae-centric events like Cali Roots. Thank you so much for the support!


Here’s a recent Stick Figure track, called Livin’ It. For more information on our creator partner program On SoundCloud, head over to on.soundcloud.com. To read more interviews from On SoundCloud Premier Partners, click right here.



Brendan Most beautiful sound in the world competition winner Marc Anderson

SoundCloudWe checked in with Marc Anderson, winner of the recent Most Beautiful Sound in the World Competition sponsored by The Sound Agency and Beautiful Now, to ask about the winning sound – a recording he calls “Dusk by the Frog Pond”, recorded on site in Kubah National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia.

“It was just by chance I came across the frog pond in Kubah National Park. It appeared to be an ideal location to record, so I set up my microphones and recorder and left them for an hour or so. The forest was pulsing with life – cicadas, frogs, birds, insects. I don’t know if I’ve heard a richer natural chorus than that afternoon in Kubah. Interestingly, one of the frog species which you can hear on the recording was only discovered in 2010.”

Marc describes himself as having, “always had a love for nature. At about the age of 14, I made birdwatching my hobby, enjoying the discovery and satisfaction that comes with seeing new species for the first time. Since then my interest has only grown and I still feel like a big kid with lots to learn.”

In addition to be a professional photographer, in recent years Marc’s become fascinated with the sounds of nature – bioacoustics: “While photography captures one dimension of nature, sound recording opens up a new world of discovery. With the excellent sound equipment available today, I love being able to capture what I feel is even more evocative and more accurate than a visual image, an audio image of a particular location and moment in time.”

You can hear more of Marc’s recordings on his SoundCloud profile, check out his new project called Nature Soundmap, and hear his interviews with Shira White of Beautiful Now and Julian Treasure of the Sound Agency, below.

Jane Creating with Constraints: Weekly communal sound-making

SoundCloud Creator: Marc Weidenbaum

The Disquiet Junto started in January 2012 by organizer Marc Weidenbaum and is an open group for anyone to participate in. The Junto is unique in that its weekly projects come with a deadline and defined constraints, like utilizing a certain sound or sticking to a specific BPM.

As it reaches over 80 weekly projects, the Junto has had more than 350 contributors from around the world so far. Back in late 2011, Marc’s Insta/gr/ambient was one of the projects that would be the foundation for the group. Musicians used Instagram photos as inspiration to create “sonic postcards” of ambient music. “It was wildly more listened to than anything I had done before, and I felt that had something to do with the energy of the musicians sensing a camaraderie unique to this larger-scale effort,” Marc says.

As more members joined, Marc began to let go of the anxiety of whether people would participate every week. “It has encouraged me to do more things that might lead to failure. On a creative level, since the Junto began, I have done fewer and fewer things that felt inherently certain or safe. The result is a weird mix: both thrilling and comforting,” he said.

Naoyuki Sasanami regularly participates in the Disquiet Junto group’s challenges every week and compares them to “experimental trials” that are opportunities for sound design. “I feel like I’m playing a weekly chess game using sound.”

In the past year, Disquiet Junto has led to several collaborative opportunities, including four live concerts in Chicago, Denver, Manhattan and San Francisco. They have also provided sound installation for Apex Art Gallery in Manhattan and scored the trailer for a documentary film about competitive blind sailing. In last month’s project “Faulty Notation,” participants were invited to interpret the San Andreas Fault as a musical score in collaboration with BLDG BLOG. A free iOS app of the map and the group’s submission may also be developed in which users can touch the map to trigger an associated recording from the group. With focused themes and constraints, the Junto has enjoyed opportunities like these that have expanded beyond the SoundCloud platform.

If you’re interested in making music as part of a communal group, Marc shares some advice: “First, I would not model whatever it is you want to do too closely on what other groups have done. Instead, I would identify the loose knit community that you find of interest, and think long and hard about that community’s motivations, about the way its constituents both produce and consume sound. I would try to develop a group approach with those unique characteristics in mind. Second, I would be prepared to alter your approach as time proceeds, in response to what the participants contribute, both in terms of the ideas they share with you but also, and equally importantly, the behavior, the predilections, the habits, they display.”

Hear the results from the Disquiet Junto’s latest weekly project focused on generative music.

Let us know what you thought about this feature on creating with constraints. We’ll be sharing more stories from the community in the coming weeks, so stay tuned. If you’ve got a story to share, leave a comment.