Tag Archives: podcasts

Ben Meet On SoundCloud Premier Partner Korey Coleman

Meet On SoundCloud Premier Partner Korey Coleman a podcaster who does a wide variety of weekly podcasts such as The Weekly Roast and Toast, The Casual Call In Show and  The Sunday Service all focussed on TV, films and all things entertainment!

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Please Introduce yourself to the SoundCloud community.

Currently I live in Austin, TX, where I have a background in animation and illustration. I began getting into broadcasting when I did a cable access show that allowed me to indulge in my favorite pastime for free – watching movies. I produced a movie review program with a corny name called ‘The Reel Deal’ for ten years. Before quitting I animated some of our reviews, which led to me being hired by a company in New York to create the website Spill.com. When that ended, I launched a Kickstarter campaign due to the demand of our fan base. Now I run DoubleToasted.com, a website featuring live streaming video shows centered on humorous pop culture commentary. Soundcloud was the first resource we used to upload content.

How do you use SoundCloud?

On DoubleToasted.com, we have three ways of delivering our content – a subscription based model for live video streaming, paid access to archived videos, and free archived audio. Soundcloud was actually the first and best way to show our audience we were still going after Spill.com shut down. Soundcloud Pro paid for itself in one month, especially with the unlimited number of uploads it gave us. This immediately allowed us to build a library of our recordings in one place for our our regular followers while gaining exposure for new followers. Once DoubleToasted.com was built, the Soundcloud API allowed for the player to be implemented easily into our customization. This was done while also retaining the benefits of the Soundcloud Partnership Program. This gives us exposure on both our site and on Soundcloud.

Describe your creative process. What is your set up like?

We live stream our programs several days a week for paid subscribers. Once the live stream is done I begin the process of rendering video into the necessary formats we need and uploading them to our servers. While this is happening I also create an audio only format that we provide to our listeners for free.

Describe how you reached certain goals or steps in your career.

I’ve always found that reaching my goals happened through being productive. I simply just like to create, and not always for money. I like to see ideas become reality. If people see you have passion and more importantly, see things through to completion, they will either want to sincerely encourage you or be a part of what you’e creating. Of course, the feedback from our audience is a great motivator. Knowing you’re reaching people all over the world and they become upset when you don’t provide them with something you’ve created is both exciting and humbling.

What does it feel like to become a Premier Partner? Where do you want to take your career next?

The Premiere Partnership program has been great! Yes, it provides us with another source of income, but it really does make what you do feel legit. It’s an acknowledgement that someone recognizes you and finds worth in what you do. It’s flattering, but It also makes me look even closer at what we do. What works, what doesn’t work, and how I can always improve. We’re still in our infancy. Not even a year old as of writing this, but It’s definitely making me look more seriously at how we can evolve. I’ve had fun playing with the video component of our business. Now I’m looking forward to seeing how we expand the way we offer audio. Soundcloud is definitely affording us that opportunity.

Who or what is inspiring you creatively? Are there people that you’d like to collaborate or work with?

I find myself inspired by the independence I have with my own business while having immediate access and interactivity with our audience. It’s like have your own personal TV show, comedy club, and concert all in one. Except here we call all the shots. Although we maintain a format there’s time limit, no censors, and restrictions on our creative process. We can try anything at anytime. We take advantage of the technology that’s out there to make our audience part of the show. Live chat, Skype, Google phone calls. The fact that we are so transparent makes the audience encourage our experimentation.

Hear the latest podcast from Korey here:

Ben Meet On SoundCloud Premier Partner Chris Morrow from The Loud Speakers Network

Chris Morrow is the co-founder of The Loud Speakers Network – a podcast network which includes the likes of The Combat Jack Show, The Brilliant Idiots and The Read among others.

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Please Introduce yourself to the SoundCloud community

My name is Chris Morrow, I’m the co-founder (along with Combat Jack) of the Loud Speakers podcast network. My career has taken some unexpected turns. I’m Brooklyn based writer, probably best known for a series of books I’ve written with Russell Simmons including Do You! and Success Through Stillness. For many years I also worked as a producer in the radio industry, mainly as a way to support myself between writing projects. A few years ago I became a fan of the Combat Jack Podcast and linked up with Combat when he was looking for some help navigating the radio waters. But the more familiar I became with podcasting, I became convinced that’s where the future of audio was and we decided to start Loud Speakers podcast network. Today we have several popular podcasts including The Read with Kid Fury and Crissle, The Brilliant Idiots with Charlamange Tha God and Andrew Schulz and yes, The Combat Jack Show. It’s hard, at least we hope so, to label our podcasts as part of any specific genre, but it’s safe to say they’re coming from a hip-hop POV. And we hope they also stand out through giving a platform to the types of voices you might not hear on other networks.

How do you use SoundCloud?

SoundCloud is the backbone of our network. After we record an episode, we upload the audio file to SoundCloud and its’ RSS feed is how we launch other platforms like iTunes. One of the features we love about SoundCloud is its’ comment section. Some people have the misconception that listening to a podcast is a “solitary” pastime. But I think when you do to the SoundCloud page for a show and see a couple of hundred comments on an episode, it’s very powerful. Really gives you the sense that you’re part of a community of people who enjoy the same thing as you. Being able to see stats is another great feature. Before SoundCloud, as a podcaster it was very difficult to gauge your audience. Over and over again I’d hear people say, “I have no idea if people are listening to this thing or not.” Now, for better or for worse, we know. If the stats are strong, it’s a confidence boost. If the numbers could be better, it’s motivation to keep tinkering with the show’s format. I’ve always felt that you should tape a podcast because you have some information you really want to share, not because you’re chasing numbers. But having stats does help give you a sense of where you fit into the larger picture.

Describe your creative process. What is your set up like?

Well, as someone who heads a network, my creative process is different from musicians. But within podcasting, there are a lot of different approaches when it comes to recording an actual show. The Combat Jack Show likes to have a lot of ppl–interns, publicists, photographers–milling around the studio when they record. Plus there are always a lot of people crammed into the studio because they just want to be part of the energy. With The Read, it’s just Fury and Crissle in the studio by themselves–I don’t even come in. But that show has tremendous energy to it. So it’s really just a matter of creating your comfort zone and figuring out how to tap into the energy you need to create.

Describe how you reached certain goals or steps in your career.

I’ve basically worked really hard for a long time, a trait I picked up from my father, who’s my biggest influence. His example was also to put your head down and do the work, don’t worry about being validated or praised for it. In terms of my career in media, Russell Simmons has probably helped me the most. My name wasn’t that big when we wrote our first book together and he could have very easily gone with someone more established. But he saw how hard I was working (I had been hired to write some scripts for him) and gave me the shot. I was able to make good on it and since then he’s supported me in a lot of different ways.

What does it feel like to become a Premier Partner? Where do you want to take your career next?

It’s been great to be a Premier Partner. It’s given Loud Speakers the freedom to experiment with different shows and give opportunities to hosts who might not otherwise by in the mix for what we do. We might not have been able to do a show like Tax Season or Fan Bros without that sort of support. Shows that don’t appeal to “traditional” podcasting crowds, but are bringing new voices to the medium. I think that’s very important. We want to keep building Loud Speakers Network and make it not just one of the top podcasting networks, but one of the top media companies in general. We’ve been able to tap into an audience whose pretty much been ignored when it comes to long form digital and we want to take advantage of what some of the other players in the space have overlooked. In terms of what I’ve learned from our fans, it’s mainly been to respect them. Their comments on the page let me know that they’re paying attention. And if we drop quality audio on time, they’re going to support us. If we’re late with the shows, or the quality isn’t up to par, they might give us a couple of chances, but then they’ll be gone. You can’t ask someone to listen to a show every Thurdsay, but then not hold up your end of the bargain.

Who or what is inspiring you creatively? Are there people that you’d like to collaborate or work with?

I’m personally inspired by a lot of different people in the podcast space. Like a lot of people I started out listening to Marc Maroon and Bill Simmons’ podcasts; now my phone is filled with them. Outside of our stuff, I enjoy what’s happening on EarWolf and also Panopoly, which is Slate’s new network. I check for Jesse Thorn’s show Bullseye, as well as Joey Diaz’s show The Church of What’s Happening Now. I also check out Longform podcast from time to time and like everyone else got caught up in Serial. I’m excited for someone the possibilities it suggested for long form, scripted podcasts.

Hear the latest The Loud Speakers Podcasts here:

 

 

Ben No kidding, SoundCloud just got funnier

The jokes are on us: this is a big week for comedy on SoundCloud.

First, we’re pleased to announce that we’re launching a slate of five new comedy Pro Partners. Our new Pro Partners follow in the footsteps of The Nerdist and Kevin Smith’s SModCO, who’ve been with us since we launched Pro at South By Southwest.

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Who’s in the new crew? There’s Earwolf, a comedy network featuring top celebrity guests from the stand-up world and beyond. The Bugle, starring John Oliver and Andy Zaltzman, the transatlantic region’s leading bi-continental satirical double-act. The comedian-owned All Things Comedy Network. Laughspin, a weekly comedy news and feature wrap-up, straight out of New Jersey. And Splitsider, which gathers up some of the best comedy podcasts out there for your listening pleasure.

That’s just the beginning of the hilarity: we’re also excited to say that Comedy Central has now joined us as a new partner on SoundCloud. Hear what they’re serving up.

And if you prefer to tell your own jokes, we have good news for you, too. We’re all about making it possible for anyone to create and share audio, which is why we have one more collaboration to tell you about: we’re also partnering with the BBC for BBC Radio’s New Comedy Award, a nationwide search to find the best new stand-up talent in the UK. Upload your entry and make the world LOL.